Most Popular Pages—Last 7 Days

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1. Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (598 visits)

Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student papers, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira Beginner Speculations. This collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written papersno slips of the keyboard or spell-checker auto-corrections can be blamed for these beautiesdemonstrates how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. The English languageHistorical Aspects. The arrival of the Anglo-Saxon ... more ] Book!



2. More Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (144 visits)

More Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student tests, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This second collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written test answers (with italics added for clarity), demonstrates once again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. Test question Explain whether the demonstratives belong to the same part of speech in this sentence: That tastes nice but this curry is cold. Answers Both the demonstratives ... more ]



3. Even More Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (98 visits)

Even More Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student tests, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This third collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written test answers, demonstrates yet again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers may think they have taught them. The English languageGrammatical aspects. Indian English is a self-contented system following its own set of rules. Language, as Spoken by Linguists “There’s a ... more ] Book!



4. A very short comparison between UH and UGJohannes Damascenus nach Campenhausen (80 visits)

A very short comparison between UH and UG. Johannes Damascenus nach Campenhausen, Seminar für Philosophie, Philologie und Philotechnie. Trends in joining the epitheton ‘universal’ to a hitherto perfectly self-sufficient and widely well-received noun are not an apanage of today’s theorists, but have a long history in academic philosophising. This shall be illustrated by a short comparison between Universal Hermeneutics (Schleiermacher 1826) (henceforth UH) and Universal Grammar (Chomsky from 1955 onwards) (better known as UG). UH, UG, 1) The psychological difference between people who are in turn authors of texts is only relative, hence they can be compared (a principle which later came to be ... more ]



5. Where No Researcher Should TreadCowell R. Augh, Ph.D. (76 visits)

Where No Researcher Should Tread. By Cowell R. Augh, Ph.D. The Academy of Northeastern State University College and Technical Institute. Introduction We, the linguistic community at large, owe a great deal of thanks to our esteemed colleague Quentin Popinjay Snodgrass for alerting us to the dangers of lexicalism. A hero of his stature doesn’t come along every day, and it would be wise of us to pay close attention to his adviceand, may I say, it is my general belief that many of us have done just that. There are those, however, who either remain ignorant of the horrors of lexicalism, or deny its ability to corrupt the minds of students and academics alike. “Everyone in my department abhors ... more ] Podcast!



6. Yet Another Collection of Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (67 visits)

Yet Another Collection of Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student tests, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This fourth collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written test answers, demonstrates once again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. The English languageGlobal English. First, I shall like to look at the factors behind the colonial expansion of the British whose English is their native language. Native English speakers ... more ] Book!



7. Linguistics Nerd CampBethany Carlson (58 visits)

Linguistics Nerd Camp. Bethany Carlson. I’ve never seen reduplication of this magnitude! ... more ]



8. Cartoon Theories of LinguisticsPart ζPhysics vs. Physics EnvyPhineas Q. Phlogiston, Ph.D. (51 visits)

Cartoon Theories of Linguistics, Part ζ—Physics vs. Physics Envy. Phineas Q. Phlogiston, Ph.D. Unintentional University of Lghtnbrgstn. Introductions are superfluous for those who have been keeping up. Now, to the heart of the matter, in which we discuss the long-recognized but little-discussed travesty of unconfidence in our field of study: ... Up next: Diachronic vs Synchronic. References, Cohen, Joel E. (1971). “Mathematics as Metaphor: a review of Dynamical System Theory in Biology. Vol. 1, Stability Theory and Its Applications by Robert Rosen.” Science, New Series, Vol. 172, No. 3984. Dymetman, Marc. (1998). “Group Theory and Computational ... more ]



9. Cartoon Theories of LinguisticsPart EPhonetics vs. PhonologyHilário Parenchyma, C.Phil. (51 visits)

Cartoon Theories of Linguistics, Part E—Phonetics vs. Phonology. Hilário Parenchyma, C.Phil. Unintentional University of Lghtnbrgstn. We will skip the introduction, as we have been there, done that. Once more into the breach! For this installment in our series on Cartoon Theories of Linguistics, we will turn our attention to Phonetics and Phonology and the difference between the two: Phonetics:, ... Phonology:, ... Thanks to Professor Phlogiston, of the Unintentional University of Lghtnbrgstn, for the opportunity of a lifetime, as a student, to, on this occasion, share with so many of my fellow linguisticians my views, as illustrated above, concerning matters, which are of such immeasurable import ... more ] Merch! Book!



10. Another Bunch of Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (51 visits)

Another Bunch of Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student tests, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This fifth collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written test answers, demonstrates once again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. Test questionCompounds and hyponymy. Question. Headed compounds can be described as hyponyms of their head stem. Do you agree with this description? Explain your answer with examples. Answers. Yes. ... more ]



11. Rock, Paper, Scissors, Computational Linguist, Nasal-Ingressive Voiceless Velar Trill, ChomskyA New Game for Every LinguistPhlange Kadigan (49 visits)

Rock, Paper, Scissors, Computational Linguist, Nasal-Ingressive Voiceless Velar Trill, Chomsky, A New Game for Every Linguist. by Phlange Kadigan, Linguistic Gamesman Extraordinaire. We are almost all quite familiar with the game commonly known as Rock-Paper-Scissors (also known in some circles as Rochambeau), in which two opponents face off, simultaneously choosing a hand shape to represent one of the three eponymous “weapons”. The interest in the game stems from the non-transitivity of the superiority of the weapons. In particular: Rock breaks Scissors and, Scissors cut Paper, but, Paper covers Rock Despite the real-world ... more ] Podcast!



12. BabelThe Priority of Written LanguageAndreas Paplopogous (47 visits)

The Priority of Written Language. One of the principle tenets of modern American linguistics is the priority of spoken as opposed to written language. This priority is understood both as importance as an object of study and as temporal precedence. Temporal precedence is further taken to include both ontogenetic and historical precedence; that is, as students in introductory linguistics classes are repeatedly told, children learn to understand speech and to speak themselves before they learn to read and to write, while historically (more properly prehistorically), the story goes, humanity had already been speaking for tens of thousands of years by the time writing was invented. It is this last conclusion, that speech ... more ]



13. Continuing Contributions to Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (41 visits)

Continuing Contributions to Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student papers, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This sixth collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written papers, demonstrates once again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. Child Language—Caregiver Input. The other family members beside the mothers give the child less responses or more ignorings in answer to the child’s linguistic ouvertures. They provide much lesser ... more ]



14. Good Enough for Folk EtymologyPart IIIA. Pocryphal & Verity du Bius (39 visits)

Good Enough for Folk Etymology Part III. A. Pocryphal & Verity du Bius, X. Quizzit Korps Center for Advanced Collaborative Studies. The SpecGram Archive Elves recently made another large collection of documents available to the XQK Directorate, by leaving them on our doorstep in black plastic sacks in the middle of the night. In order to avoid any more unfortunate incidents involving a cucumber, a marmot, or the Director’s favourite coffee mug, we were given the task of cataloging these documents. Going through the collection, we have found again that, while apparently lacking provenance (which the Archive Elves still attribute to a bizarre set of circumstances ... more ]



15. Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowBook VIIMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (38 visits)

Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), Book VII, gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student tests, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This seventh collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written test answers, demonstrates once again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. Test question. Suppose you are in a food market and you overhear a conversation between a customer and a stall-holder behind you. The customer says: I’ll take these chillies and that bunch of ... more ] Book!



16. A Fair Number More Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (37 visits)

A Fair Number More Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student papers, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This eighth collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written papers, demonstrates once again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. Reporting on a group project, which involved comparing current uses of a set of words across older and younger speakers. Our individual reports were then put together and improvised. We all did interviews and ... more ] Book!



17. Against Discarding Symbols from Anglicist WritingThik W. Trals, PhD (37 visits)

Against Discarding Symbols from Anglicist Writing. Thik W. Trals, PhD, Institution of Linguistics and (Multi)Lingual Symbolism, Division of Criticism and Indignation. Many scholars of orthography (and of writing broadly) claim that Anglo-Saxon ABCs contain too many symbols. Our list of writing symbols, it is said, is too abundant. This “surplus” you may maintain, afflicts our youth, and it is also injurious to adults. Poppycock! This claim is totally without validity, as I will show in this short discussion. Gradual phasing out, or instant discarding, of particular symbols (a notion all too popular with many “scholars”) is in truth a malicious attack on orthographic civility, adoption of which ... more ]



18. Cryptolinguistic Puzzle ⠼⠊Mary Shapiro (36 visits)

Cryptolinguistic Puzzle ⠼⠊. Mary Shapiro, Truman State University. Like other cryptic crosswords, the clues in this puzzle are not straightforward. Unlike most, however, this one focuses mainly on languages and linguistics. For instance, the clue for Zapotec might be “Oto-Manguean variety alters pez coat” (anagram of pez coat), or “Indigenous Mexican language to destroy overtime prior to European Commission” (ZAP + O.T. + E.C.), or “a nice top, a zany blouse conceals retro Oaxacan language” (niCE TOP, A Zany), or many other combinations of puns, anagrams, or typographic quirks. Punctuation in clues is often misleading. Each clue contains both a ... more ]



19. Vol CLXXXIII, No 4 (33 visits)

Speculative Grammarian Volume CLXXXIII, Number 4 ... Trey Jones, Editor-in-Chief Keith Slater, Executive Editor Mikael Thompson, Senior Editor Jonathan Downie, Contributing Editor, Associate Editors, Pete Bleackley Mark Mandel, Assistant Editors, Virginia Bouchard Emily Davis Vincent Fish Deak Kirkham Yuval Wigderson, Editorial Associates, Samuel Andersson Bethany Carlson James Pasto Mary Shapiro, Joey Whitford, Comptroller General We Jest Because We Care... Wait, No, We Jest Because We Don’t February 2019 ... more ]



20. Further Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t KnowMadalena Cruz-Ferreira (32 visits)

Further Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know, (because they aren’t actually true), gathered at great personal risk of, psycholinguistic harm from actual student papers, by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira This ninth collection of students’ pearls of wisdom, laboriously digitised from hand-written papers, demonstrates once again how students new to the study of language speculate about grammar after having imperfectly absorbed what their teachers think they have taught them. On language contact and language variation. Contacts will result in modification of the language while others were frequently borrowed to increase its lexicon. The Scandinavians also left their influence and so were the Danes in ... more ] Book!



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Last updated Feb. 20, 2019.